HB 2479A Estimates human cause of black carbon

06/26/2021
HB 2479A VOTE: NO
Died In Committee

Status (overview) of bill: https://olis.leg.state.or.us/liz/2021R1/Measures/Overview/HB2479
Committee assigned to bill: https://olis.leg.state.or.us/liz/2021R1/Committees/JWM/Overview


This bill requires the Department of Environmental Quality to establish and maintain an estimate of human-caused black carbon emissions in Oregon, and to estimate the net impact of human-caused black carbon sources on climate change. modifies definition of “global warming” to include certain aerosol air contaminants, including black carbon. Directs Department of Environmental Quality to estimate black carbon emissions in this state and recommend mitigation strategies to Legislature by September 15, 2022.

Personal Choice and Responsibility
The bill is misdirected relating black carbon emissions to climate change. Black carbon is a pollutant than many steps are being taken to reduce the pollutant for health reasons. As a short-lived pollutant, ir shouldn’t be lumped in with more serious carbons and focus on specific populated areas.

Limited Government
Black carbon is a climate pollutant that results from incomplete combustion of fossil fuels and burning of other substances. Globally, the largest sources of black carbon are from household biomass burning and transportation, especially from diesel engines, and is a short-lived pollutant, which remains in the atmosphere for a short period of time. Black carbon is a component of fine particulate matter air pollution that can have negative health and environmental impacts in areas where it is emitted. House Bill 2479A requires the Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) to track estimated human-caused black carbon emissions in this state and estimate the net impact of human-caused black carbon sources on climate change. Requires DEQ to use estimated black carbon emissions to assist with the duties and functions of the department related to climate change. Requires DEQ to provide the results of the estimated black carbon emissions in a report—including recommendations for strategies to mitigate black carbon emissions and may include recommendations for legislation—to the Environmental Quality Commission and to the interim committees of the Legislative Assembly related to the environment no later than September 15, 2022.

Free Markets
Black carbon is a short-lived pollutant that shouldn’t be lumped in with more serious carbons. Diesel use on farms can dissipate in a short time and shouldn’t be lumped into a generality with other longer lasting pollutants.

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