SB 289 Bias crimes hit outdoor recreation

06/23/2021


This bill prohibits a person convicted of first or second degree bias crime from entering or remaining in any building, land or water of the state or publicly owned land used for outdoor recreation for a period of at least six months, but not longer than five-years in addition to any other penalty.

Personal Choice and Responsibility
This bill now seems to be a complete switch from protecting prisoner and convict rights. Since it is claimed that the majority of convictions are people of color, isn’t this a racist concept? ORS 166.155 should be of concern to every person when perceptions are used for conviction of a crime.

Limited Government
Stipulates person convicted of bias crime (ORS 166.155 or 166.165) may not be prohibited from entering building or land or water area under OPRD jurisdiction to perform community service or from entering the grounds included within the State Capitol State Park. Requires the State Marine Board (Board) to suspend a person’s boating safety education card and revoke their waterway access permit and prohibits boating safety education card or waterway access permit from being issued for a period of at least six months, but not longer than five-years from the date of the conviction of first or second degree bias crime on waters of the state or publicly owned land used for outdoor recreation. Requires court to notify OPRD or Board of the relevant conviction. Authorizes court that sentences a person to community service for first or second degree bias crime that occurred on waters of the state or publicly owned land used for outdoor recreation to include: habitat restoration or restoration or maintenance of outdoor recreation facilities under the supervision of OPRD, State Department of Fish and Wildlife or Board and anti-bias training. Authorizes court to revoke all licenses, tags and permits issued to person convicted of first or second degree bias crime while they were angling, taking shellfish, hunting, trapping or on the waters of this state or publicly owned land used for recreation. In ORS 166.155 to 166.165, a person commits a bias crime in the second degree if the person Intentionally subjects another person to offensive physical contact, perceived threatening injury, or tampers or interferes with property, having no right to do so with the intent to cause substantial inconvenience to another person because the person’s perception of the other person is race, color, religion, gender identity, sexual orientation, disability or national origin; and is a first degree crime if intentionally, knowingly or recklessly causes these actions.

Leave a Reply