HB 3139 Parent Disclosure of Suicide Assessment

04/15/2021
HB 3139 VOTE: YES
Signed into Law by Gov Brown

Status (overview) of bill:https://olis.oregonlegislature.gov/liz/2021R1/Measures/Overview/HB3139#
Committee assigned to bill:https://olis.oregonlegislature.gov/liz/2021R1/Committees/SHSMHR/Overview


This bill requires parental disclosure when minor receives suicide assessment, intervention, treatment, or support services, and encourages mental health care providers who believe a minor is at risk of attempting suicide to disclose relevant information to a parent, guardian or other individuals who can help take necessary safety measures.

Personal Choice and Responsibility
Data has shown that the pandemic’s effects on children and youth coincides with a startling rise in mental health problems, including the increase of suicidal ideation among those between 10 and 17 years old. This bill will empower mental health professionals to rely on their experience and expertise to enlist support of a young person’s family and loved ones who can help before it’s too late.

Limited Government
Currently, Oregon law allows but does not require practitioners to inform parents when a minor receives suicide assessment, intervention, treatment, or support services. According to the Oregon Health Authority (OHA), suicide was the second leading cause of death among 10- to 24-year-olds in Oregon in 2018. There were 139 youth suicides in Oregon in 2018. House Bill 3139 Defines mental health care provider as licensed by the appropriate board. Specifies conditions under which a mental health care provider may disclose relevant health information about a minor without the minor’s consent, including a provider assessing a minor to be at serious and imminent risk. Specifies conditions under which a mental health care provider is not required to disclose a minor’s treatment and diagnosis information.

Comments

  1. Parents absolutely have a right to know when their children are in a mental health crisis and are suicidal. School counselors and faculty have an obligation to involve the child’s family in this very serious matter. Therefore, I strongly urge this bill become law.

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